Saturday Mix – Same Same But Different – 19 May 2018

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Saturday Mix – Same Same But Different – 19 May 2018

Photo Credit

‘Mindlovemisery’s Menagerie’, ‘Saturday Mix’, #SSBD.

Your ‘Same Same But Different’ task is to take the five challenge words and NOT use them in your writing. That’s right, you need to dig out your thesaurus and find a synonym for each word instead.

The words this week are – Cushion, Time, Roof, Water, Fork.

  1. cushion – beanbag, headrest, squab
  2. time – future, moment,
  3. roof – ceiling, rafter, canopy
  4. water – rain, tears, saliva
  5. fork –  divide, split, angle

Writing form is either poetry or prose. I have highlighted the words I used.

Enjoying the Moment

Using a knapsack for a headrest
with no canopy for sun shelter
lucky no rain for several days
river was still running high
the angle the tide went
moment to enjoy
warmth of the sun
rest in peace
next day
work

Reverse Etheree Poetry – The same form as an Etheree poem only difference is that the syllabic count is reversed: 10-9-8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1

#Weekly Tanka Prompt #Poetry Challenge – Week 98 – Happiness & Nature

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#Weekly Tanka Prompt #Poetry Challenge – Week 98 – Happiness & Nature

Photo Credit

#weeklytankachallenge -98

The “Weekly Tanka Challenge Prompt” is now also a Poetry Prompt Challenge (any form).

Use the weekly poetry prompt “happiness & nature”  to write a poem – any form, your choice, also please feel free to substitute these prompt words with a “synonym”.

I have been trying a few new ones, you may like to try one yourself.

Sidlak Poetry – is a structured poetry consisting of five lines with 3-5-7-9 syllables and a color. The last line must be a color that describes the whole poem or the feeling of the writer.

Etheree Poetry – Syllabic Pattern: 1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9-10, Rhyme: None

Reverse Etheree Poetry – The only difference is that the syllabic count is reversed: 10-9-8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1

Double Etheree – Two Etheree stanzas, where the second one is reversed.Syllabic count: 1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9-10-10-9-8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1Rhyme not required

Triolet  Poetry – consists of 8 lines. Line 1, 4 and 7 are the same line repeated.  So are lines 2 and 8.

Haiku/Senryu Poetry – Here is an in-depth description of Haiku/Senryu Poem (also called human haiku) is an unrhymed Japanese verse consisting of three unrhymed lines of five, seven, and five syllables (5, 7, 5) or 17 syllables in all. Senryu is usually written in the present tense and only references to some aspect of human nature or emotions. They possess no references to the natural world and thus stand out from nature/seasonal haiku.

Shadorma Poetry– is a Spanish poetic form. A poem of six lines 3-5-3-3-7-5 syllables no set rhyme scheme. It can have many stanzas, as long as each follows the meter.

Bussokusekika Poetry – a pattern of 5-7-5-7-7-7 Tanka poem with an extra phrase of seven added on at the end.

Retourne Poetry Retourne is a French form of poetry. It is in tetrameter, sixteen lines, eight syllables per line, does not require a specific rhyme scheme.

Stanza 2 line 1 repeats Stanza 1 line 2 
Stanza 3 line 1 repeats Stanza 1 line 3 
Stanza 4 line 1 repeats Stanza 1 Line 4

Tetractys   5 lines of 1, 2, 3, 4, 10 syllables (total of 20), it can be written with more than one verse but must follow suit with an inverted syllable count.

Double Tetractys A decastich (10-line stanza) with an emphasis on the syllabic count of each line. Syllabic count: 1-2-3-4-10-10-4-3-2-1 It should express a complete thought and may be on any theme and express any mood. Rhyme is optional.

Tanka Poetry – consists of five units, usually with the following pattern of 5-7-5-7-7 which is syllables.

The first three lines (5/7/5) are the upper phase. This upper stage is where you create an image in your reader’s mind.

The last two lines (7/7) of a Tanka poem are called the lower phase.  The final two lines should express the poet’s ideas about the image that was created in the three lines above.

Not sure of your Syllable count?

  1. You can use the photo above, your own or no photo at all.
  2. The choice is yours, write any style of poetry you wish with the prompt

Copy and paste the link to your finished poem in the comments below. I will acknowledge them the following week, also share on social networks, as I receive them.

Tanka Poem – using the prompt “happiness & nature”

although everyone
gets through life without much stress
many have problems
think of happiness and love
daily walks, enjoy nature

Bloggers that posted on the Weekly Tanka Prompt Poetry Challenge – Week 97 – Bouquet & Greenery – 16 May 2018

Joelle LeGendre – Author of Ranting Along blog, loves writing and her animals, a blog with humor that you just have to smile.

Liz is the author of Bronx Beyond Borders – Interesting writer enjoys poetry and short stories.

Reena Saxena – Founder of ReInventions — Coach, Trainer, Writer and Personal Branding Consultant.

Hecblobber Author of “Playing with words”, he loves writing poetry, a blog of poetry, please check it out.

Deborah – Author of A Wise Woman’s Journey Blog, Deborah is a poet and as she say’s a “cat mama”.

The Bag Lady – Cheryl is a widow, handicapped, a constant writer on her blog, loves doing most things.

Frank J Tassone – Writer, Teacher, Husband and father, he has a Haijin in Action blog.

Lynn – Author of A Poem in my Pocket, she enjoys writing especially poetry.

Linda Lee Lyberg – Author of Charmed Chaos writes about Musings of Life, Love, and Linguini, she has interesting poetry, short stories.

M. Naazato Lakazato – Author of Cactus Haiku, Daily Haiku or Senryu for fun

Indira – Author of Amaltaas blog, knew all along about, love, compassion, compatibility and friendship, but now she has discovered much more, please check her blog she covers many subjects.

Sarah Whiley – Author of Sarah Whiley’s blog, she writes short stories, poems, and has a weekly challenge for writers, interesting website.

Angela Uwphers Rueger – Author of The Abundant Heart Blog. She has some great bible study post on her site, Likes writing poetry. This week she wrote five Sidlak poems relating to Christianity, they are amazing, please check it out.

This lady, sorry I couldn’t find your name is the author of Savvy Streaks she likes writing poetry and enjoys nature

Wanda M. Williams – Author of Cookies and Moo, a wonderful lady, that enjoys life through new eyes, after the death of her husband nearly two years ago.

Amaka Paul – Author of Soma Writes has a great quote, You must do the things you think you cannot do”-Eleanor Roosevelt. Well said and so true of many writers, she writes about most things, poetry is one of them.

Vandana Bhasin – Author of  Feelings 161 say’s “My Feelings My Freedom”, she likes reading, writing, music, and nature, it shows on her blog.

Thank you I appreciate all of you for responding to the Weekly Poetry Challenge.

10-line Poem Challenge #30: Sonnetina Tre

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10-line Poem Challenge #30: Sonnetina Tre

#10LPC – If you would like to take part in this challenge please use the above link

Photo Credit

Happiness is Loving a Horse

The horse, a large singled toed animal
a girls life forever an enchantment
human interaction unchangeable
just sighting a horse that is excitement
Loving and caring is most important
grooming and stall cleaning a daily job
care you give will never be forgotten
riding a special treat never will stop
summed up both are friends extremely natural
they both look so glamorous together.

Sonnetina Tre
Two quatrains and a couplet, usually in iambic tetrameter or pentameter.
The stanzas may appear in any order, but the couplet usually comes at the end.
Rhyme scheme varies according to the whim of the poet.

Rhyme scheme for this one: ababcdcdee
This one is in iambic tetrameter (10 syllables per line) both stanzas together since it is all one thought.

Weekend Writing Prompt #55 – Twaddle

Weekend Writing Prompt #55 – Twaddle

two-boys-3396713_640

Photo Credit

Thank you, Sammi Cox, for the prompt – Twaddle- 98 words

The challenge is simple: each week you will be given an exact number of words you can use to write a poem or piece of prose.  You can use any format or style you like; go wherever your inspiration takes you.  The only rules are these:

  • your poem/prose must contain this week’s word.  The word does not have to count towards the exact word count total – it can be in the title, or the first letters of the lines of a poem can spell it out – you can be as creative as you want as long as it’s there somewhere.
  • the length of your poem/prose must match the number of words stated in this week’s challenge.  No more.  No less.

Writing Twaddle

Twaddle a slang word in English
meaning talking a lot of nonsense
tempted to write meaningless words
it would be like a child reading a book

Father said if I didn’t know a word
I would not try to learn what it was
I would always say “wheelbarrow”
That saying was said all my schooldays
but it has never left my mind ever.
Now I have written ninety-eight words
well, some of it was twaddle,
most of it was making a statement
that you can write anything you like
even if it is a thought, mostly just piffle.

98 words

wk-55-twaddle

Sonnetina Tre Poetry – Enticing Food

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Sonnetina Tre Poetry Enticing Food

Photo Credit

Tummy Tuesdays

Enticing Food

Eclairs and creampuffs enticing rich food
choux pastry, made with unsalted butter
piping bag with a fluted nozzle screwed
a soft mixture, no need for a cutter
cooked in a preheated oven and viewed
smell, don’t let the heart get in a flutter
as cream puffs are less fatting than eclairs
strawberries with a whipped cream filling, nice
need to ask questions, just be a heckler
we all know enticing food is a vice.

Sonnetina Tre
Two quatrains and a couplet, usually in iambic tetrameter or pentameter.
The stanzas may appear in any order, but the couplet usually comes at the end.
Rhyme scheme varies according to the whim of the poet.

Rhyme scheme for this one: abababcdcd
This one is in iambic pentameter (10 syllables per line) both stanzas together since it is all one thought.

#Weekly Tanka Prompt #Poetry Challenge – Week 97 – Bouquet & Greenery

800px-Flowers_ Wedding

#Weekly Tanka Prompt #Poetry Challenge – Week 97 – Bouquet & Greenery

Photo Credit

#weeklytankachallenge -97

The “Weekly Tanka Challenge Prompt” is now also a Poetry Prompt Challenge (any form).

Use the weekly poetry prompt “bouquet & greenery”  to write a poem – any form, your choice, also please feel free to substitute these prompt words with a “synonym”.

I have been trying a few new ones, you may like to try one yourself.

Sidlak Poetry – is a structured poetry consisting of five lines with 3-5-7-9 syllables and a color. The last line must be a color that describes the whole poem or the feeling of the writer.

Etheree Poetry – Syllabic Pattern: 1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9-10, Rhyme: None

Reverse Etheree Poetry – The only difference is that the syllabic count is reversed: 10-9-8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1

Double Etheree – Two Etheree stanzas, where the second one is reversed.Syllabic count: 1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9-10-10-9-8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1Rhyme not required

Triolet  Poetry – consists of 8 lines. Line 1, 4 and 7 are the same line repeated.  So are lines 2 and 8.

Haiku/Senryu Poetry – Here is an in-depth description of Haiku/Senryu Poem (also called human haiku) is an unrhymed Japanese verse consisting of three unrhymed lines of five, seven, and five syllables (5, 7, 5) or 17 syllables in all. Senryu is usually written in the present tense and only references to some aspect of human nature or emotions. They possess no references to the natural world and thus stand out from nature/seasonal haiku.

Shadorma Poetry– is a Spanish poetic form. A poem of six lines 3-5-3-3-7-5 syllables no set rhyme scheme. It can have many stanzas, as long as each follows the meter.

Bussokusekika Poetry – a pattern of 5-7-5-7-7-7 Tanka poem with an extra phrase of seven added on at the end.

Retourne Poetry Retourne is a French form of poetry. It is in tetrameter, sixteen lines, eight syllables per line, does not require a specific rhyme scheme.

Stanza 2 line 1 repeats Stanza 1 line 2 
Stanza 3 line 1 repeats Stanza 1 line 3 
Stanza 4 line 1 repeats Stanza 1 Line 4

Tetractys   5 lines of 1, 2, 3, 4, 10 syllables (total of 20), it can be written with more than one verse but must follow suit with an inverted syllable count.

Double Tetractys A decastich (10-line stanza) with an emphasis on the syllabic count of each line. Syllabic count: 1-2-3-4-10-10-4-3-2-1 It should express a complete thought and may be on any theme and express any mood. Rhyme is optional.

Tanka Poetry – consists of five units, usually with the following pattern of 5-7-5-7-7 which is syllables.

The first three lines (5/7/5) are the upper phase. This upper stage is where you create an image in your reader’s mind.

The last two lines (7/7) of a Tanka poem are called the lower phase.  The final two lines should express the poet’s ideas about the image that was created in the three lines above.

Not sure of your Syllable count?

  1. You can use the photo above, your own or no photo at all.
  2. The choice is yours, write any style of poetry you wish with the prompt

Copy and paste the link to your finished poem in the comments below. I will acknowledge them the following week, also share on social networks, as I receive them.

Haiku/Senryu poem – prompt “bouquet & greenery”

beauty of roses
bouquet of sparkling color
ribbons, greenery

Bloggers that posted on the Weekly Tanka Prompt Poetry Challenge – Week 96 – Work & Horse – 9 May 2018

Joelle LeGendre – Author of Ranting Along blog, loves writing and her animals, a blog with humor that you just have to smile.

The Bag Lady – Cheryl is a widow, handicapped, a constant writer on her blog, loves doing most things.

Frank J Tassone – Writer, Teacher, Husband and father, he has a Haijin in Action blog.

HecblobberAuthor of “Playing with words”, he loves writing poetry, a blog of poetry, please check it out.

Indira – Author of Amaltaas blog, knew all along about, love, compassion, compatibility and friendship, but now she has discovered much more, please check her blog she covers many subjects.

Reena Saxena – Founder of ReInventions — Coach, Trainer, Writer and Personal Branding Consultant.

Deborah – Author of A Wise Woman’s Journey Blog, Deborah is a poet and as she say’s a “cat mama”.

Lynn – Author of A Poem in my Pocket, she enjoys writing especially poetry.

Sarah Whiley – Author of Sarah Whiley’s blog, she writes short stories, poems, and has a weekly challenge for writers, interesting website.

Amaka Paul – Author of Soma writes, she has a great quote, You must do the things you think you cannot do”-Eleanor Roosevelt. Well said and so true of many writers, she writes about most things, poetry is one of them.

Linda Lee Lyberg – Author of Charmed Chaos writes about Musings of Life, Love, and Linguini, she has interesting poetry, short stories.

Liz is the author of Bronx Beyond Borders – Interesting writer enjoys poetry and short stories.

Weekend Writing Prompt #52- Emergence

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Weekend Writing Prompt #52- Emergence

Photo Credit

Thank you, Sammi Cox, for the prompt Emergence –  now I have caught up on the challenges that I missed while writing for two other challenges in the month of April.

Challenge

Prose Challenge – In no more than 300 words, write a story about a character growing into a better person. Don’t forget to mention the type of person they were before, what motivated them to change and what they’ve been through to get to where they are today.

Poetry Challenge – Write a 10 line rhyming poem (the pattern of rhyming/form/structure is your choice) on the theme of transformation and emergence.

Romance Coming to Light

beaming smiles of delight
there was a pillow fight
gentle whispers to excite
true love was insight
like a bright candle-light
ready for a good-night
next morning, what a sight
things were in the limelight
young lovers were very quiet
loving senses still highly ripe.

Weekend Writing Prompt #51 – Raindrops

raindrops

Weekend Writing Prompt #51 – Raindrops

Thank you, Sammi Cox, for the prompt – Raindrops, catching up on challenges that I missed while writing for two other challenges in the month of April.

Challenge

Prose Challenge – Write a story on any theme, with an upper limit of 250 words, set in the rain.

Poetry Challenge – Write an acrostic poem, where the first letter of each line spells “Raindrops” as it is read from top to bottom.

Watching the Rain

Raindrops dancing onto the ground
Acting as if they are enjoying the fun
I like watching the rain falling on the grass
Not that I ever liked the heavy falling rain
Dripping off the leaves to the ground
Rainwater soaking the dry hot soil
Over the wall, drops fell onto the flowers
Popping off the leaves to the ground
Soaking everything with welcomed moisture

3 Days Quote Challenge – Day Three Forget-me-not (3)

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3 Days Quote Challenge – Day Three Forget-me-not (3)

Photo Credit

Thank you, Cheryl – Author of Rugby843.blog known as, The Bag Lady, a very active writer in the blogosphere world, for nominating me

Rules quotes

Day Three Quote:

“God is fully aware that you and I are not perfect. Let me add: God is also fully aware that the people you think are perfect are not. And yet we spend so much time and energy comparing ourselves to others—usually comparing our weaknesses to their strengths. This drives us to create expectations for ourselves that are impossible to meet. As a result, we never celebrate our good efforts because they seem to be less than what someone else does.” 

― Dieter F. UchtdorfForget Me Not

I nominate:

Joelle LeGendre – Author of Ranting Along blog

Bharath Upendra – Author of Ridiculous Bharath blog

Dwight L Roth – Author of Roth Poetry Blog

3 Days Quote Challenge – Day Two – Forget-me-not (2)

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3 Days Quote Challenge – Day Two – Forget-me-not (2)

Photo Credit

Thank you, Cheryl, – Author of Rugby843.blog known as, The Bag Lady, a very active writer in the blogosphere world, for nominating me.

Rules quotes

Day two Quote: Forget-me-not

“I would like to use this little flower as a metaphor. The five petals of the little forget-me-not flower prompt me to consider five things we would be wise never to forget….first, forget not to be patient with yourself…second, forget not the difference between a good sacrifice and a foolish sacrifice…third, forget not to be happy now…fourth, forget not the why of the gospel…fifth, forget not that the Lord loves you.” 

― Dieter F. UchtdorfForget Me Not

I nominate:

Author of Bilocalalia

Deborah – Author of A Wise Woman’s Journey Blog

Amaka Paul – Author of Somawrites