Weekend Writing Prompt #51 – Raindrops

raindrops

Weekend Writing Prompt #51 – Raindrops

Thank you, Sammi Cox, for the prompt – Raindrops, catching up on challenges that I missed while writing for two other challenges in the month of April.

Challenge

Prose Challenge – Write a story on any theme, with an upper limit of 250 words, set in the rain.

Poetry Challenge – Write an acrostic poem, where the first letter of each line spells “Raindrops” as it is read from top to bottom.

Watching the Rain

Raindrops dancing onto the ground
Acting as if they are enjoying the fun
I like watching the rain falling on the grass
Not that I ever liked the heavy falling rain
Dripping off the leaves to the ground
Rainwater soaking the dry hot soil
Over the wall, drops fell onto the flowers
Popping off the leaves to the ground
Soaking everything with welcomed moisture

3 Days Quote Challenge – Day Three Forget-me-not (3)

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3 Days Quote Challenge – Day Three Forget-me-not (3)

Photo Credit

Thank you, Cheryl – Author of Rugby843.blog known as, The Bag Lady, a very active writer in the blogosphere world, for nominating me

Rules quotes

Day Three Quote:

“God is fully aware that you and I are not perfect. Let me add: God is also fully aware that the people you think are perfect are not. And yet we spend so much time and energy comparing ourselves to others—usually comparing our weaknesses to their strengths. This drives us to create expectations for ourselves that are impossible to meet. As a result, we never celebrate our good efforts because they seem to be less than what someone else does.” 

― Dieter F. UchtdorfForget Me Not

I nominate:

Joelle LeGendre – Author of Ranting Along blog

Bharath Upendra – Author of Ridiculous Bharath blog

Dwight L Roth – Author of Roth Poetry Blog

3 Days Quote Challenge – Day Two – Forget-me-not (2)

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3 Days Quote Challenge – Day Two – Forget-me-not (2)

Photo Credit

Thank you, Cheryl, – Author of Rugby843.blog known as, The Bag Lady, a very active writer in the blogosphere world, for nominating me.

Rules quotes

Day two Quote: Forget-me-not

“I would like to use this little flower as a metaphor. The five petals of the little forget-me-not flower prompt me to consider five things we would be wise never to forget….first, forget not to be patient with yourself…second, forget not the difference between a good sacrifice and a foolish sacrifice…third, forget not to be happy now…fourth, forget not the why of the gospel…fifth, forget not that the Lord loves you.” 

― Dieter F. UchtdorfForget Me Not

I nominate:

Author of Bilocalalia

Deborah – Author of A Wise Woman’s Journey Blog

Amaka Paul – Author of Somawrites

Weekend Writing Prompt #50 – Evergreen – Trees Necessity of Life

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Weekend Writing Prompt #50 – Evergreen – Trees Necessity of Life

Thank you, Sammi Cox, for the prompt – Evergreen catching up on challenges that I missed while writing for two other challenges in the month of April.

Challenge

Prose Challenge – Write a story with a word limit of 125 words on the theme of ‘timelessness’.

Bonus point for each of the following:

  • using the word “evergreen”
  • setting the story in the photo above

Poetry Challenge – Write an 8 line poem that contains the following words:

  • Everlasting
  • Evergreen

Trees Necessity of Life

a universe of evergreen trees
a forest of pure wilderness
needed for all to breathe freely
killing off the toxins in the air
not all forest is everlasting
nature destroys, fire, volcanoes
humans destroy by falling trees
all are needed, an energy of survival.

3 Days Quote Challenge – Day One – Forget-me-not

forget-me-not-1222341_640 - with text

3 Days Quote Challenge – Day One – Forget-me-not

Thank you, Cheryl, – Author of Rugby843.blog known as, The Bag Lady, a very active writer in the blogosphere world, for nominating me, you rock.

Rules quotes

What Forget-me-nots Symbolize?

Born in September ‘forget-me-nots’ are your birth flowers.

Alaska’s State Flower

symbolizing enduring love

Day One Quote:

“ There is something inspiring and sublime about the little forget-me-not flower. A symbol of the little things that make your life joyful and sweet. Never forget that you must be patient and compassionate with yourself, that some sacrifices are better than others, that you need not wait for a golden ticket to be happy.”

Dieter F. Uchtdorf

I nominate:

Indira, Author of Amaltaas blog

Sarah – Author of Sarah Whiley’s blog

Hecblobber – Author of Playing with words

Weekend Writing Prompt #49 – Random (3) – Unhappy Marriage Epiphany

horizon

Weekend Writing Prompt #49 – Random (3) – Unhappy Marriage Epiphany

Thank you, Sammi Cox, for this word prompt –  Fortitude – Resolute – Epiphany, catching up on challenges that I missed while writing for two other challenges in the month of April.

Challenge

Prose Challenge – Write a story in 75 words or less that is inspired by the photo prompt and one of the word prompts.

Poetry Challenge – Write a poem of any length that includes all three of the word prompts and where one of the lines is repeated at least once.

Unhappy Marriage Epiphany

life
marriage
family fights
unhappiness
holding no values
epiphany, change now
wedding day vows memories
resolute is important
marriage failure on the horizon
determination to correct the faults
fortitude means lots of courage needed
beam of light sparkling in her blue eyes
as I told her unwavering
our life is changing right now
up to me to stay strong
with newfound values
unhappiness
will be gone
smiling
joy

Double Tetractys A decastich (10-line stanza) with an emphasis on the syllabic count of each line. Syllabic count: 1-2-3-4-10-10-4-3-2-1 It should express a complete thought and may be on any theme and express any mood. Rhyme is optional.

Weekend Writing Prompt #48 – Glimpse

jackdaw

#Weekend Writing Prompt #48 – Glimpse

Thank you, Sammi Cox, for the prompt – Glimpse, catching up on challenges that I missed while writing for two other challenges in the month of April.

Write a piece of flash fiction, a poem, a chapter for your novel…anything you like.  Or take the challenge below.

Challenge:

Prose Challenge – Write a story in 250 words about something seen out of the corner of the eye.  Choose from one of the following genres:

  • Fantastical – about a fairy or other mythological creature or
  • Horror – about a monster or ghost etc

Poetry Challenge – Write a poem in five lines, where each line is no longer than 10 words, inspired by either the word prompt or the photo prompt.

Abandoning its Watch

a glimpse silver grey bird green sheen on the throat
swell of glory on its face peering over the ridge
it was only a fleeting glance as it took flight
a very inspiring sight to me it was for sure
spying on me most likely wondering what I was doing

Weekend Writing Prompt #53 Quiescent – Dawn

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Weekend Writing Prompt #53 Quiescent – Dawn

Photo Credit

Quiescent Early in the morning

the silence just before dawn

pause and enjoy the moment

sharpness of an early morning

quietly piercing the inner soul

every day dawn is different

listen carefully, not a sound

beautiful wonderful feeling

let it wrap around the body

slight mist on the steep hills

fog rising from the still river

no distractions joy and peace

tranquility is a real blessing

fragrance from the garden

some a little smelly, mildew

sweet smell of honeysuckle

as the sun starts to warm up

the environment preserved

a few moments of quietness

deep within the now quiescent

intimacy of my still warm body

spiritual moment, body filled with confidence

107 words

Sammi Cox challenge is simple: this weeks word is Quiescent.

  • your poem / prose must contain this week’s word.  The word does not have to count towards the exact word count total – it can be in the title, or the first letters of the lines of a poem can spell it out – you can be as creative as you want as long as it’s there somewhere.
  • the length of your poem / prose must match the number of words stated in this week’s challenge.  No more.  No less.

wk-53-quiescent

#Weekly Tanka Prompt #Poetry Challenge – Week 96 – Work & Horse

Horses

#Weekly Tanka Prompt #Poetry Challenge – Week 96 – Work & Horse

Photo Credit

#weeklytankachallenge -96

The “Weekly Tanka Challenge Prompt” is now also a Poetry Prompt Challenge (any form).

Use the weekly poetry prompt “work & horse”  to write a poem – any form, your choice, also please feel free to substitute these prompt words with a “synonym”.

I have been trying a few new ones, you may like to try one yourself.

Sidlak Poetry – is a structured poetry consisting of five lines with 3-5-7-9 syllables and a color. The last line must be a color that describes the whole poem or the feeling of the writer.

Etheree Poetry – Syllabic Pattern: 1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9-10, Rhyme: None

Reverse Etheree Poetry – The only difference is that the syllabic count is reversed: 10-9-8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1

Double Etheree – Two Etheree stanzas, where the second one is reversed.Syllabic count: 1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9-10-10-9-8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1Rhyme not required

Triolet  Poetry – consists of 8 lines. Line 1, 4 and 7 are the same line repeated.  So are lines 2 and 8.

Haiku/Senryu Poetry – Here is an in-depth description of Haiku/Senryu Poem (also called human haiku) is an unrhymed Japanese verse consisting of three unrhymed lines of five, seven, and five syllables (5, 7, 5) or 17 syllables in all. Senryu is usually written in the present tense and only references to some aspect of human nature or emotions. They possess no references to the natural world and thus stand out from nature/seasonal haiku.

Shadorma Poetry– is a Spanish poetic form. A poem of six lines 3-5-3-3-7-5 syllables no set rhyme scheme. It can have many stanzas, as long as each follows the meter.

Bussokusekika Poetry – a pattern of 5-7-5-7-7-7 Tanka poem with an extra phrase of seven added on at the end.

Retourne Poetry Retourne is a French form of poetry. It is in tetrameter, sixteen lines, eight syllables per line, does not require a specific rhyme scheme.

Stanza 2 line 1 repeats Stanza 1 line 2 
Stanza 3 line 1 repeats Stanza 1 line 3 
Stanza 4 line 1 repeats Stanza 1 Line 4

Tetractys   5 lines of 1, 2, 3, 4, 10 syllables (total of 20), it can be written with more than one verse but must follow suit with an inverted syllable count.

Double Tetractys A decastich (10-line stanza) with an emphasis on the syllabic count of each line. Syllabic count: 1-2-3-4-10-10-4-3-2-1 It should express a complete thought and may be on any theme and express any mood. Rhyme is optional.

Tanka Poetry – consists of five units, usually with the following pattern of 5-7-5-7-7 which is syllables.

The first three lines (5/7/5) are the upper phase. This upper stage is where you create an image in your reader’s mind.

The last two lines (7/7) of a Tanka poem are called the lower phase.  The final two lines should express the poet’s ideas about the image that was created in the three lines above.

Not sure of your Syllable count?

  1. You can use the photo above, your own or no photo at all.
  2. The choice is yours, write any style of poetry you wish with the prompt

Copy and paste the link to your finished poem in the comments below. I will acknowledge them the following week, also share on social networks, as I receive them.

My Poem a Tanka poem – using the prompt “work & horse”

work, never finished
even when you think you’re done
like a working horse
you know when tomorrow comes
it will need doing again

Bloggers that posted on the Weekly Tanka Prompt Poetry Challenge – Week 95 – Landscape & Homes – 2 May 2018

Joelle LeGendre – Author of Ranting Along blog, loves writing and her animals, a blog with humor that you just have to smile.

Liz is the author of Bronx Beyond Borders – Interesting writer enjoys poetry and short stories.

Helene Vaillant – A lady in her seventies writing ”Willow Poetry” a survivor of cancer, doing the most with her life.

Reena Saxena – Founder of ReInventions — Coach, Trainer, Writer and Personal Branding Consultant.

The Bag Lady – Cheryl is a widow, handicapped, a constant writer on her blog, loves doing most things.

HecblobberAuthor of “Playing with words”, he loves writing poetry, a blog of poetry, please check it out.

Lynn – Author of A Poem in my Pocket, she enjoys writing especially poetry.

Deborah – Author of A Wise Woman’s Journey Blog, Deborah is a poet and as she say’s a “cat mama”.

Frank J Tassone – Writer, Teacher, Husband and father, he has a Haijin in Action blog.

Sarah Whiley – Author of Sarah Whiley’s blog, she writes short stories, poems, and has a weekly challenge for writers, interesting website.

Linda Lee Lyberg – Author of Charmed Chaos writes about Musings of Life, Love, and Linguini, she has interesting poetry, short stories.

Indira – Author of Amaltaas blog, knew all along about, love, compassion, compatibility and friendship, but now she has discovered much more, please check her blog she covers many subjects.

Amaka Paul – Author of Soma writes, she has a great quote, You must do the things you think you cannot do”-Eleanor Roosevelt. Well said and so true of many writers, she writes about most things, poetry is one of them.

#dVerse Quadrille #56 – Muddle up that Muse

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#dVerse Quadrille #56 – Muddle up that Muse

Photo Credit

#dVerse – Posted by Whimsygizmo in Quadrille

Write a poem of exactly 44 words (not counting the title), including some form of the word “muddle.

Poetic Muddle Mind

a fleeting muddle of memory
within an overworked body
with a disorganized brain
creating a real solution
by ignoring the facts
and muddling through.

whats the point anyway
significance of nothing
putting it all together,
with pen and paper
writing in a poetic way.