All About Pigs

One little pig

All About Pigs

Pigs are highly social and intelligent animals.

Because of the similarities between pigs and humans, pigs are used for human medical research.

A pig uses its snout to dig into the soil to find food, has a very acute sense organ, and because of the excellent sense of smell, they are used to find truffles in many European countries.

Pigs have panoramic vision it is thought they have no eye accommodation

Where's my Mum, I want a feed

Pigs have small lungs in relation to their body size and are thus more susceptible than other domesticated animals to fatal bronchitis and pneumonia.

Pigs also can acquire human influenza.

Because of their relative lack of sweat glands, pigs often control their body temperature using behavioral thermoregulation. Wallowing, which often consists of coating the body with mud.

Older pigs will consume three to five gallons of water per day.

Sows may savage their own piglets, often if they become severely stressed so that maybe what happened in this situation, as the piglet were not ours, it was given to us knowing we would spend the time needed to keep it alive.

I am a coke bottle baby.

Pigs can be aggressive in defending themselves and their young, as my young grandson found out when he went into the shed to have a look at the piglets, lucky for him we had a hay baler in the corner of the shed, he managed to get behind it, lucky as I don’t know what would have happened to him, but he never when near any pig after that even though they would always follow anyone thinking they would get a feed.

He is an adult now with children of his own, we often bring up the subject and have a good laugh, though it wasn’t funny at the time.

I feel full now

Domestic pigs are intelligent and can be trained to perform numerous tasks and tricks, you don’t even need to train them for some things.

I had nine piglets one time to rear as their mother died at birth, they were reared indoors as day old piglets, needing to be kept warm and feed regularly all night long, I had a radio going all the time, those piglets never grunted or made noise like a pig, as they had never heard the mother pig, but those piglets could sing beautiful tunes just like the music they had heard on the radio, they even spoke human language that you could understand.

When they got older they were put in the shed with a heat lamp above them, every morning we would put them in a wheelbarrow and take them to a cage pen to feed on grass etc, wish I had a photo of those piglets sitting in the wheelbarrow with very little room to move, they never jump off, sometimes I think it is easier to rear piglets than bringing up teenagers, at least they never answered back. Ha ha.

Happy little pig

Pigs are not a dirty animal as everyone says, they will use one corner of the building to pass motions etc, it was never scattered all over the building like most of the other animals, they keep their beds clean, even the piglets never soiled their bed.

Quote to end this post   Winston Churchill famously said that “Dogs look up to man. Cats look down to man. Pigs look us straight in the eye and see an equal.”

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Photo Credit  –  A pig trained to find truffles.

Weekly Tanka Prompt Challenge – Week 44 – Reflections & Vision

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Weekly Tanka Prompt Challenge – Week 44 – Reflections & Vision

Photo Credit

#weeklytankachallenge -44

Simple Guidelines.

Take the words “reflections & vision” and write a tanka poem.

English tanka poetry consists of five units, usually with the following pattern of    5-7-5-7-7 which is syllables.

You can use the picture above, your own or no picture at all.

Copy and paste the link of your finished tanka in the comments below, I will acknowledge them the following week, also share on social networks.

My tanka poem  – using the words “reflections & vision”.

just watching movements

reflections pass very fast

one sees many things

much of life revolves around

escaping the vision line

Bloggers that entered “Weekly Tanka Challenge – Week 43 – “summer & color”. Thank you.

Mick E Talbot    He loves peace and writes interesting poetry.

Erhynireh  – She loves those random memories, a sweet lady.

Sarah – She has completed NaNoWriMo five times and started a sixth.

Lynn – A poem in my pocket lady, I enjoy her poetry.

StoryTeller enjoys writing interesting short stories and poetry.

Marie – She is a teacher at a local primary school where she is a governor.

Sangbad – He says “Thoughts all I have; words to express them”.

Sammi Scrabbles – Sammi Cox lives in the UK and loves writing, she has a new weekend writing prompt.

Bronx Beyond Borders – Interesting writer, check her out she may surprise you.

Reena Saxena  – See is a coach, trainer, personal branding consultant, plus much more…

Susan Witmer Miller – A homeschooling mom, lives in Lancaster County PA.

Weekend Writing Prompt #1 – Outcast

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Weekend Writing Prompt #1 – Outcast

Please link to Sammiscribbles if using this prompt it is not mine

Word Prompt – Outcast

Picture Prompt above

Poetry Challenge – Write a seven line poem where the first letter of each line spells out “outcast” when reading from top to bottom.

 The theme of the poem should somehow tie into the definition of the word.

Dandelion Outcast

Out comes a sunny face

Useful and edible to humans

Though most people dislike me in the lawn

Causing me to hide in little cracks

So I can grow in harmony

Tell I can reproduce

Weekly Tanka Prompt Challenge – Week 43 – Summer & Color

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Weekly Tanka Prompt Challenge – Week 43 –  Summer & Color

Photo Credit

#weeklytankachallenge -43

Simple Guidelines.

Take the words “summer & color” and write a tanka poem.

English tanka poetry consists of five units, usually with the following pattern of    5-7-5-7-7 which is syllables.

You can use the picture above, your own or no picture at all.

Copy and paste the link of your finished tanka in the comments below, I will acknowledge them the following week, also share on social networks.

My tanka poem  – using the words “summer & color”.

summer is color
gardens add mystery and charm
relaxing the mind
pleasures are there to enjoy
go with the flow and enjoy

Bloggers that entered “Weekly Tanka Challenge – Week 42 – “War & Peace”. Thank you.

The Bag Lady

Susmita

Sangbad

Sarah

Mick E Talbot

Marie

StoryTeller – Jane Swanson

Lynn – A Poem in my Pocket Lady

SWritings

My Posts A to Z Challenge April 2017

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Photo Credit

My Posts A to Z Challenge April 2017

Animals Birds & Insects Pantoum Poetry

The candle hasn’t burnt out yet for writing Pantoum Poetry, maybe I should publish a book with all my poetry written in this style.

A is for Ants

B is for Budgerigar

C is for Chipmunks

D is for Deer

E is for Eagle

F is for Fox

G is for Giraffe

H is for Hare

I is for Insects

J is for Jackal

K is for Kakapo

L is for Lynx

M is for Markhor

N is for Nightingale

O is for Otter

P is for Pheasant

Q is for Quail

R is for Rattlesnake

S is for Scorpion

T is for Tuatara

U is for Uguisu – Japanese Bush-Warbler

V is for Vulture

W is for Weasel

X is for X-ray Tetra – a fish

Y is for Yak

Z is for Zebra

I’m taking a break now to rest for a while. I will still be posting the Weekly Tanka Challenge on Wednesday morning.

Winter is just around the corner, and it certainly feels like it today, Mount Taranaki has its first snow on it, looks beautiful

Thanks to all my supporters, comments, likes and love shown I appreciate it.

Take care and keep smiling with lots of laughter.

Z is for Zebra #atozchallenge

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A to Z April 2017  Challenge – Animals Birds & Insects Pantoum Poetry

Photo Credit

30 April 2017 – Z is for Zebra

Zebras are a species of African equids united by distinctive black and white stripes.
Unlike their closest relatives, horses, zebras have never been domesticated
Grevy’s Zebra and the Mountain Zebra are considered to be endangered species
They are generally social animals that live in small harems to large herds

Unlike their closest relatives, horses, zebras have never been domesticated
Zebras have excellent eyesight. It is believed that they can see in color
They are generally social animals that live in small harems to large herds
Like most ungulates, zebra’s eyes are on the sides of its head, giving a wide field of view

Zebras have excellent eyesight. It is believed that they can see in color
Zebras also have night vision, although not as advanced as that of most of their predators Like most ungulates, zebra’s eyes are on the sides of its head, giving a wide field of view
Zebras have excellent hearing and have larger, rounder ears than horses

Zebras also have night vision, although not as advanced as that of most of their predators
Like other ungulates, zebras can turn their ears in almost any direction
Zebras have excellent hearing and have larger, rounder ears than horses
In addition to superb eyesight and hearing, zebras have acute senses of smell and taste.

Like other ungulates, zebras can turn their ears in almost any direction
Like horses, zebras sleep standing up, only when others are around to warn off predators
In addition to superb eyesight and hearing, zebras have acute senses of smell and taste
Zebras feed almost entirely on grasses but occasionally eat shrubs, twigs, leaves and bark.

Like horses, zebras sleep standing up, only when others are around to warn off predators
Female zebras mature earlier than males, a mare may have her first foal by the age of three
Zebras feed almost entirely on grasses but occasionally eat shrubs, twigs, leaves and bark
Males (Stallion) are not able to breed until the age of five or six years old

Female zebras mature earlier than males, a mare may have her first foal by the age of three
Mares may give birth to one foal every twelve months. She nurses the foal for up to a year
Males (Stallion) are not able to breed until the age of five or six years old
Like horses, zebras are able to stand, walk and suckle shortly after they are born.

Mares may give birth to one foal every twelve months. She nurses the foal for up to a year
Grevy’s Zebra and the Mountain Zebra are considered to be endangered species
Like horses, zebras are able to stand, walk and suckle shortly after they are born
Zebras are a species of African equids united by distinctive black and white stripes.

Z

Interesting theory about the Zebra StripesThe black and white stripes may have one or several functions.

1.The vertical striping may help the zebra hide in the grass by disrupting its outline.

2. The stripes may help to confuse predators by motion dazzle—a group of zebras standing or moving close together may appear as one large mass of flickering stripes, making it more difficult for the lion to pick out a target.

3. The stripes may serve as visual cues and identification. Although the striping pattern is unique to each individual.

4. Experiments by different researchers indicate that the stripes are effective in attracting fewer flies, including blood-sucking tsetse flies and tabanid horseflies

5. Stripes may be used to cool the zebra. Air may move more quickly over black light-absorbing stripes while moving more slowly over white stripes.

Zebras have four gaits: walk, trot, canter, and gallop.

How to write Pantoum Poetry

http://shadowpoetry.com/resources/wip/pantoum.html

Y is for Yak #atozchallenge

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A to Z April 2017  Challenge – Animals Birds & Insects Pantoum Poetry

Photo Credit A yak in the Nepalese Himalayas.

29 April 2017 – Y is for Yak

The domestic yak is a long-haired domesticated bovid descended from the wild yak
The yak is a herd animal found in the mountainous region of Central Asia
They tend to gather in herds from ten to a hundred yaks, most are females
There is a large domestic population of yaks, only a few wild yaks remaining.

The yak is a herd animal found in the mountainous region of Central Asia
Yaks are still used for transporting large loads through the mountain passes
There is a large domestic population of yaks, only a few wild yaks remaining.
Yaks are heavily built animals with a bulky frame, sturdy legs, and rounded cloven hooves

Yaks are still used for transporting large loads through the mountain passes
Extremely dense, long fur that hangs down lower than the belly to keep them warm
Yaks are heavily built animals with a bulky frame, sturdy legs, and rounded cloven hooves
They have small ears and a wide forehead, with smooth horns generally dark in color.

Extremely dense, long fur that hangs down lower than the belly to keep them warm
The tail is long and horselike rather than tufted like the tails of cattle or bison.
They have small ears and a wide forehead, with smooth horns generally dark in color.
The udder in females, scrotum in males, are small and hairy, protection against the cold.

The tail is long and horselike rather than tufted like the tails of cattle or bison.
The yak breeds in the warmer months, gestation lasts between 257 and 270 days
The >udder in females, scrotum in males, are small and hairy, protection against the cold.
The female finds a secluded spot to give birth, calf is able to walk within ten minutes of birth

The yak breeds in the warmer months, gestation lasts between 257 and 270 days
Females of both the wild and domestic forms typically give birth only once every other year
The female finds a secluded spot to give birth, calf is able to walk within ten minutes of birth
Yaks may live for more than twenty years in domestication, somewhat shorter in the wild.

Females of both the wild and domestic forms typically give birth only once every other year
They tend to gather in herds from ten to a hundred yaks, most are females
Yaks may live for more than twenty years in domestication, somewhat shorter in the wild.
The domestic yak is a long-haired domesticated bovid descended from the wild yak.

Y

How to write Pantoum Poetry http://shadowpoetry.com/resources/wip/pantoum.html