ANZAC Day – 25 APRIL 2016

Anzac Day now promotes a sense of unity, perhaps more effectively than any other day on the national calendar.
It’s now 2017, Dad my thought’s are always with you, I miss you so.
You were one of the lucky one’s to return, but the sight’s you endured as a 22-year-old, were never forgotten, as we remember the stories you told.

Ramblings of a Writer

Anzac_Day_1

Photo CreditEach year on ANZAC Day in Te Awamutu, New Zealand the graves of War Veterans are decorated.

In Remembrance Of those Special Soldiers – Never to be Forgotten.

25 April is ANZAC DAY where we remember all who fell and fought saving our future.

Anzac Day is a national day of remembrance in Australia and New Zealand and is commemorated by both countries on 25 April every year to honor members of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) who fought at Gallipoli in Turkey during World War I.

It now more broadly commemorates all those who died and served in military operations for their countries.

I had uncles that never return from the war, in fact, it was the end of the Corbishley line in New Zealand as Charles was the only son, killed in action.

My Father-in-law fought in World War One, he was one…

View original post 162 more words

Q is for Quail #atozchallenge

724px-Brown_Quail

A to Z April 2017  Challenge – Animals Birds & Insects Pantoum Poetry

Photo Credit. – The Brown Quail

20 April 2017 – Q is for Quail

The common quail is a small ground-nesting game bird in the pheasant family Phasianidae
It inhabits woodlands and forest areas around the world, more than 15 different species
Its characteristic call of “wet my lips”, this species of quail is more often heard than seen.
It is a small, rounded bird, essentially streaked brown with a white eyestripe

It inhabits woodlands and forest areas around the world, more than 15 different species
This is a terrestrial species, feeding on seeds and insects on the ground
Its characteristic call of “wet my lips”, this species of quail is more often heard than seen.
It is  difficult to see, keeping hidden in crops, reluctant to fly, preferring to creep away instead

This is a terrestrial species, feeding on seeds and insects on the ground
Often the only indication of its presence is the distinctive “wet-my-lips”  song of the male.
It is difficult to see, keeping hidden in crops, reluctant to fly, preferring to creep away instead
Lays 6-12 eggs in a ground nest. The eggs take from 16–18 days to hatch.

Often the only indication of its presence is the distinctive “wet-my-lips” song of the male
Upon attaining an age of 6–8 weeks, this quail breeds on open arable farmland and grassland
Lays 6-12 eggs in a ground nest. The eggs take from 16–18 days to hatch.
Quail eggs are considered a delicacy in many parts of the world

Upon attaining an age of 6–8 weeks, this quail breeds on open arable farmland and grassland
The brown quail has been introduced to New Zealand it has been of least concern by threatened species
Quail eggs are considered a delicacy in many parts of the world, sometimes used raw or cooked
The brown quail is a plump, stocky bird growing to a length of 17 to 22 centimeters

The brown quail has been introduced to New Zealand it has been of least concern by threatened species
In New Zealand, it is found at altitudes up to 1,000 meters (3,300 ft) introduced in the 1860s and 1870s
Quail eggs are considered a delicacy in many parts of the world, sometimes used raw or cooked
Newly hatched chicks are precocial and are cared for by both parents for a while

In New Zealand, it is found at altitudes up to 1,000 meters (3,300 ft) introduced in the 1860s and 1870s
The male taking on the caring role after two weeks to allow the female to start on the next clutch of eggs
Newly hatched chicks are precocial and are cared for by both parents for a while
There is an extended breeding season with clutches of half a dozen or more eggs being laid

The male taking on the caring role after two weeks to allow the female to start on the next clutch of eggs
With its characteristic call of “wet my lips”, this species of quail is more often heard than seen
There is an extended breeding season with clutches of half a dozen or more eggs being laid
The common quail is a small ground-nesting game bird in the pheasant family Phasianidae.

Q

How to write Pantoum Poetry http://shadowpoetry.com/resources/wip/pantoum.html

Week 13: 100 Word Wednesday – Troubled Waters

image Week 13

100 Word Wednesday – Week 13 – Troubled Waters

Image Credit: Bikurgurl

#100WW  – Join Bikurgurl in the 100 Word Weekly Writing Challenge using the image as a prompt.

Troubled Waters

Driving slowly along the river I came to the point where only the brave would venture, that jetty wasn’t for the faint-hearted.

Because of stories from days-gone-by that someone had been devoured by a large fish that had jumped out of the water.

There’s not a lot you can do here, the sign says it all “ No this, No that”, so after those stories, it should be saying “NO Fishing”.

Surprise, surprise people were fishing, I decided to move on, I wasn’t waiting for that large fish to leap out of the water.

Amanohashidate in Miyazu Japan

Amanohashidate in Miyazu Japan

This month I have been exploring the “Motherland” of haiku and Tanka, Japan.

Yesterday we had a look at Itsukushima Shrine and the Torii Gate in Japan, one of the three most beautiful sites in Japan.

699px-nihonsankei

Photo Credit                          NihonSankei. Three Views of Japan         

Today I’m taking a look at Amanohashidate in Miyazu, Kyoto prefecture Japan, Number two of the three most beautiful sites in Japan.

The third most beautiful sites in Japan is the Pine-clad islands of Matsushima which I wrote about at the beginning of February. 

800px-amanohashidate_view_from_mt_moju02s3s4592

Photo Credit – Amanohashidate view from Mt Moju0

Amanohashidate in Miyazu, Kyoto prefecture, Japan. This photograph is a view from the Amanohashidate View Land on Mt. Monju.

A thin strip of land connects two opposing sides of Miyazu Bay. This sand bar is 3.3 km long and covered with about 7,000 pine trees.

It can be viewed from mountains on either side of the bay or it can be traversed on foot. Near the southern end is Chion-ji, a Buddhist temple.

On the bar is the Isoshimizu fresh water well cherished since the Heian period, which was selected as one of 100 best springs and rivers in Japan by the Environmental Agency in 1985.

untitled

Photo Credit – Winter view of Amanohashidate in Miyazu, Japan

My tanka poem using the study of Amanohashidate in Miyazu.

unusual sandbar

covered with pine trees at sea

fresh water on bar

middle of a salty sea

must walk that track through pine trees

Carpe Diem #1160 Kema, birth-place of Yosa Buson

mount_fuji_no_yama_new_logo_191

Carpe Diem #1160 Kema, birth-place of Yosa Buson

This month at Carpe Diem I’m exploring the “Motherland” of haiku, Japan.

Today I’m taking a look at Kema, birth-place of Yosa Buson.

800px-osaka_castle_02bs3200

Photo Credit                                            Osaka  Castle

Looking for information about Kema-cho, Miyakojima Ward in Osaka city hasn’t been very successful, so I will now write what I have found out about Yosa Buson a (Haiku Master).

Yosa Buson original surname Taniguchi, Born 1716 – January 17, 1784  in the village of Kema in Settsu Province, (now Kema-cho, Miyakojima Ward in Osaka city).

He learned poetry under the tutelage of the haikai master Hayano Hajin.

Yosa Buson settled in the city of Kyoto at the age of 42.

It is around this time that he began to write under the name of Yosa, which he took from his mother’s birthplace (Yosa in the province of Tango).

Yosa Buson married at the age of 45 and had one daughter, Kuno. From this point on, he remained in Kyoto, writing and teaching poetry at the Sumiya.

He died at the age of 68 and was buried at Konpuku-ji in Kyoto.

yosabusongrave

Photo Credit                                             Yosa Buson Grave.

Yosa Buson’s grave is also located at the temple.

Little History of Konpuku-ji in Kyoto Japan

It is a Zen Buddhist temple in Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, Japan.

During the Genroku era (1688-1704), the temple was restored by Tesshu from the nearby Enkō-ji, and acted as a branch of that temple. It was also converted to the Rinzai sect.

When Matsuo Bashō traveled to Kyoto to visit his friend Tesshu, he stayed in a thatched hut in the back of the garden, and after some time, the hut was named Basho-an.

However, it fell into ruin, and in 1776 Yosa Buson restored it.

The thatched roof hut stands on the east side of the garden, and inside is a tea room.

My tanka poem using the study of Yosa Buson.

yosa buson poet

haiku star seventeenth century

kind hearted loved life

feels good reading about him

painted in the stars above

Carpe Diem #1159 Matto, birthplace of Chiyo-Ni

mount_fuji_no_yama_new_logo_191

Carpe Diem #1159 Matto, birthplace of Chiyo-Ni

This month at Carpe Diem I’m exploring the “Motherland” of haiku, Japan.

Today we are taking a look Matto – Birthplace of Chiyo-Ni

Matto, is a village in Kaga Province, now Hakusan Ishikawa Prefecture Japan.

hakusan_city_office

Photo Credit                 Hakusan city office

Matto also is known as the city that never sleeps, unfortunately, doesn’t exist anymore because in 2005 it became part of the new town Hakusan, Ishikawa Prefecture.

The modern city of Hakusan was established on February 1, 2005, from the merger of the city of Matto, and the towns of Mikawa and Tsurugi, and the villages Kawachi, Oguchi, Shiramine, Torigoe and Yoshinodani (all from Ishikawa District).

Eleven cities are located in Ishikawa Prefecture.

640px-hakusan01

Photo Credit  –     Mount Hakusan from east of Hakusan Mountains, Honshu, Japan.

Who is Chiyo-Ni?

Fukuda Chiyo-ni 1703 – 2 October 1775) Born in Matto, she was a Japanese Poet of the Edo period, widely regarded as one of the greatest female haiku poets.

Chiyo-ni began writing haiku poetry at age 7.

By the age of 17, she had become very popular all over Japan for her poetry.

202px-caga_no_chiyo_standing_beside_a_well

Photo Credit – Chiyo-ni standing beside a well. This woodcut by Utagawa Kuniyoshi illustrates her most famous haiku: finding a bucket entangled in the vines of a morning glory, she will go ask for water rather than disturb the flower.

Her poems, although mostly dealing with nature, work for a unity of nature with humanity.

She is perhaps best known for the haiku below

morning glory!
the well bucket-entangled,
I ask for water

Today, the morning glory is a favorite flower for the people of her hometown, because she left a number of poems on that flower.

If you would like to read more of her poems Click here. 

Chiyo-ni’s teachers were the students of Basho, and she stayed true to his style, although she did develop on her own as an independent figure.

After becoming a nun, Chiyo took the Buddhist name, Soen.

My tanka poem using prompt of the study of Matto – a village in Kaga Province, now Hakusan Ishikawa Prefecture.

matto-hakusan

new name old name still the same

beauty never leaves

breaking away from old poets

new poets writing haiku

100 Word Wednesday – Week 6 – Missing Cake

derucaketimestwo

Image Credit: Bikurgurl 2016

100 Word Wednesday – Week 6 – Missing Cake

#100WW  – Join Bikurgurl in the 100 Word Weekly Writing Challenge using an image as a prompt.

Missing Cake

Everything was ready for valentine evening at home.

A knock on the door on answering it, a policeman told me there had been an accident and asked me if I could come with him and identify the body.

The body was my partner, I don’t remember much of that evening.

Arriving home that night I when straight upstairs leaving the table as it was before the police arrived.

Next morning, surprise, the table had been cleared, no cake, strange the doors were all locked?

To this day I never found who removed the cake, hope it went to heaven for the angels.