Alphabet Haiku: This Week – Letter L – Lynx

398px-Lynx_lynx2

Alphabet Haiku: This Week – Letter L – Lynx

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Lynx labeled large
left leg landing listlessly
lacerated, lame

Authors Note: The photo above is an Eurasian lynx, of the four lynx species it is the largest in size, it is also the third largest predator in Europe, so that’s where I got  the first line of the Haiku from Wikipedia.

  • Every word in the haiku must begin with the same letter.
  • When written in English, it generally follows the syllabic pattern 5-7-5
  • Haiku/Senryu Poetry – Here is an in-depth description of Haiku/Senryu Poem (also called human haiku) is an unrhymed Japanese verse consisting of three unrhymed lines of five, seven, and five syllables (5, 7, 5) or 17 syllables in all. Senryu is usually written in the present tense and only references to some aspect of human nature or emotions. They possess no references to the natural world and thus stand out from nature/seasonal haiku.

Copyright © 2018 Elsie Hagley

Alphabet Haiku: This Week – Letter K – Kakapo

800px-Kakapo

Alphabet Haiku: This Week – Letter K – Kakapo

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#Alphabet Haiku Challenge or AHC

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keen kind kakapo
keeping katydids knocking
king kauri, kudos

Authors NoteThe kakapo or night owl is a species of large, flightlessnocturnal, ground-dwelling parrot of New Zealand. It is critically endangered; as of April 2018, the total known adult population was 149, surviving kakapo are kept on three predator-free islands.

Katydids are a type of insect, found on branches of trees or bushes and are most active at night and sing in the evening, so this is where my haiku comes from the Kakapo are nocturnal, keeping the katydids from sleeping so they keep knocking (other words rubbing there forelegs together) singing to each other.

The King Kauri is a large tree growing in New Zealand where the kakapo could be living in the underground around them, nicely finishing the haiku (Kudos).

Hope you liked my story about the writing for this week Alphabet Haiku.

  • Every word in the haiku must begin with the same letter.
  • When written in English, it generally follows the syllabic pattern 5-7-5
  • Haiku/Senryu Poetry – Here is an in-depth description of Haiku/Senryu Poem (also called human haiku) is an unrhymed Japanese verse consisting of three unrhymed lines of five, seven, and five syllables (5, 7, 5) or 17 syllables in all. Senryu is usually written in the present tense and only references to some aspect of human nature or emotions. They possess no references to the natural world and thus stand out from nature/seasonal haiku.

Copyright © 2018 Elsie Hagley

Alphabet Haiku: This Week – Letter J – Jackal

Jackel

Alphabet Haiku: This Week – Letter J – Jackal

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#Alphabet Haiku Challenge or AHC

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Jubilant Jackal
justifies jittering jaws
jumping joyfully

  • Every word in the haiku must begin with the same letter.
  • When written in English, it generally follows the syllabic pattern 5-7-5
  • Haiku/Senryu Poetry – Here is an in-depth description of Haiku/Senryu Poem (also called human haiku) is an unrhymed Japanese verse consisting of three unrhymed lines of five, seven, and five syllables (5, 7, 5) or 17 syllables in all. Senryu is usually written in the present tense and only references to some aspect of human nature or emotions. They possess no references to the natural world and thus stand out from nature/seasonal haiku.

Copyright © 2018 Elsie Hagley

Alphabet Haiku: This Week – Letter I – Insects

400px-Insect_antennae_comparison (1)

Alphabet Haiku: This Week – Letter I – Insects

Photo Credit – Insects, their antennae comparison

#Alphabet Haiku Challenge or AHC

If you would like to take part in this challenge please use the above link

Three Haiku Poems this week for the letter “I” about Insects

industry implants
identify imperfect
idiot insects

imagine insects
involving intimately
in ideal issues

imperil insects
illustrate inexperience
immature impasse

  • Every word in the haiku must begin with the same letter.
  • When written in English, it generally follows the syllabic pattern 5-7-5
  • Haiku/Senryu Poetry – Here is an in-depth description of Haiku/Senryu Poem (also called human haiku) is an unrhymed Japanese verse consisting of three unrhymed lines of five, seven, and five syllables (5, 7, 5) or 17 syllables in all. Senryu is usually written in the present tense and only references to some aspect of human nature or emotions. They possess no references to the natural world and thus stand out from nature/seasonal haiku.

Copyright © 2018 Elsie Hagley

Alphabet Haiku: This Week – Letter H – Hare

778px-Brown_Hare444

Alphabet Haiku: This Week – Letter H – Hare

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#Alphabet Haiku Challenge or AHC

If you would like to take part in this challenge please use the above link

hare harmlessly hops
hawk hovering, hastens home
hesitates, horror

  • Every word in the haiku must begin with the same letter.
  • When written in English, it generally follows the syllabic pattern 5-7-5
  • Haiku/Senryu Poetry – Here is an in-depth description of Haiku/Senryu Poem (also called human haiku) is an unrhymed Japanese verse consisting of three unrhymed lines of five, seven, and five syllables (5, 7, 5) or 17 syllables in all. Senryu is usually written in the present tense and only references to some aspect of human nature or emotions. They possess no references to the natural world and thus stand out from nature/seasonal haiku.

Copyright © 2018 Elsie Hagley

Alphabet Haiku: This Week – Letter G – Giraffe

450px-Giraffa_camelopardalis_thornicrofti

Alphabet Haiku: This Week – Letter G – Giraffe

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#Alphabet Haiku Challenge or AHC

If you would like to take part in this challenge please use the above link

Two Haiku’s for G this week.

galloping giraffe
gleefully glimpses green gorge
grazes greedily

glamorous giraffe
gracefully glows gingerly
genuine gusto

  • Every word in the haiku must begin with the same letter.
  • When written in English, it generally follows the syllabic pattern 5-7-5
  • Haiku/Senryu Poetry – Here is an in-depth description of Haiku/Senryu Poem (also called human haiku) is an unrhymed Japanese verse consisting of three unrhymed lines of five, seven, and five syllables (5, 7, 5) or 17 syllables in all. Senryu is usually written in the present tense and only references to some aspect of human nature or emotions. They possess no references to the natural world and thus stand out from nature/seasonal haiku.

Alphabet Haiku: This Week – Letter F – Fox

774px-Fennec_Fox.jpg

Alphabet Haiku: This Week – Letter F – Fox

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#Alphabet Haiku Challenge or AHC

If you would like to take part in this challenge please use the above link

fluffy fennec fox
features fabulous feline
flamboyant focus

  • Every word in the haiku must begin with the same letter.
  • When written in English, it generally follows the syllabic pattern 5-7-5
  • Haiku/Senryu Poetry – Here is an in-depth description of Haiku/Senryu Poem (also called human haiku) is an unrhymed Japanese verse consisting of three unrhymed lines of five, seven, and five syllables (5, 7, 5) or 17 syllables in all. Senryu is usually written in the present tense and only references to some aspect of human nature or emotions. They possess no references to the natural world and thus stand out from nature/seasonal haiku.

Alphabet Haiku: This Week – Letter D – Deer

691px-Fawn_in_Forest_edit

Alphabet Haiku: This Week – Letter D – Deer

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#Alphabet Haiku Challenge or AHC

If you would like to take part in this challenge please use the above link

delightful dapper
delinquent dominant deer
delivers distress

Note – dapper means – neat and precise.

  • Every word in the haiku must begin with the same letter.
  • When written in English, it generally follows the syllabic pattern 5-7-5
  • Haiku/Senryu Poetry – Here is an in-depth description of Haiku/Senryu Poem (also called human haiku) is an unrhymed Japanese verse consisting of three unrhymed lines of five, seven, and five syllables (5, 7, 5) or 17 syllables in all. Senryu is usually written in the present tense and only references to some aspect of human nature or emotions. They possess no references to the natural world and thus stand out from nature/seasonal haiku.

Alphabet Haiku: This Week – Letter C – Chipmunk

800px-Tamias_striatus2

Alphabet Haiku: This Week – Letter C – Chipmunk

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 #Alphabet Haiku Challenge, AHC

If you would like to take part in this challenge please use the above link

chittering chipmunk
chewing cracking cereals
cheeky cheek cleavage

  • Every word in the haiku must begin with the same letter.
  • When written in English, it generally follows the syllabic pattern 5-7-5
  • Haiku/Senryu Poetry – Here is an in-depth description of Haiku/Senryu Poem (also called human haiku) is an unrhymed Japanese verse consisting of three unrhymed lines of five, seven, and five syllables (5, 7, 5) or 17 syllables in all. Senryu is usually written in the present tense and only references to some aspect of human nature or emotions. They possess no references to the natural world and thus stand out from nature/seasonal haiku.

Alphabet Haiku: – Letter B – Budgerigars

800px-Budgies

Alphabet Haiku: This Week – Letter B – Budgerigars

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#Alphabet Haiku Challenge or AHC

If you would like to take part in this challenge please use the above link

bright budgerigars
babbling birds bickering back
breeding bald babies

591px-Melopsittacus_undulatus_-chicks_and_eggs_in_a_nest_box-8a

Photo Credit

  • Every word in the haiku must begin with the same letter.
  • When written in English, it generally follows the syllabic pattern 5-7-5
  • Haiku/Senryu Poetry – Here is an in-depth description of Haiku/Senryu Poem (also called human haiku) is an unrhymed Japanese verse consisting of three unrhymed lines of five, seven, and five syllables (5, 7, 5) or 17 syllables in all. Senryu is usually written in the present tense and only references to some aspect of human nature or emotions. They possess no references to the natural world and thus stand out from nature/seasonal haiku.