Carpe Diem Namaste, the Spiritual Way #4 keepers of the earth

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Carpe Diem Namaste, the Spiritual Way #4 keepers of the earth

Nature is the keeper of the earth – Namaste to the seasons

In Roman mythology, Vertumnus is the god of seasons, change and plant growth, as well as gardens and fruit trees. He could change his form at will; using this power, for more information.

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Photo Credit – Vertumnus and Pomona (1682–1683) by Luca Giordano

I’m with nature all the time, I hear and breath nature, I feel it and I sense nature all day long it keeps me at peace with my body.

Yes, nature is gorgeous, it can be cruel at times, but with positive thought’s you can come out on the right side of life.

Writing Tanka poetry keeps me whole as nature has to be the thought from a vision that you see, (the last two lines can take you where ever you like to finish the tanka) but the first three lines like Haiku  5 – 7 – 5 are syllable and is a vision you see.

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Photo Credit and information about the six ecological seasons.

Some calendars in south Asia use a six-season method where the number of seasons between summer and winter can number from one to three.

The dates are fixed at even intervals of months.

The six seasons are ascribed to two months each of the twelve months in the Hindu calendar. 

My tanka based on keepers of the earth

seasons come and go

hours of daylight disappear

in the wintertime

heaven appears in the night

spreading the cool earth with ice

Carpe Diem Namaste, The Spiritual Way #3 Spiritual love based on Zen Buddhism

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Carpe Diem Namaste, The Spiritual Way #3 Spiritual love based on Zen Buddhism

Haiku is not only the poetry of nature but also the poetry of the spiritual nature.

At Carpe Diem we are going to explore the spiritual background of haiku and tanka.

This episode of “Namaste” is titled spiritual love based on Zen Buddhism and our love for nature.

Zen is a Japanese word translated from the Chinese word Chan, which means “meditation”.

Zen uses meditation to help practitioners go beyond simply thinking about Zen. The goal in Zen is to attain satori. This Japanese word translates as “enlightenment“.

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Photo Credit                    Japanese Buddhist monk from the Soto Zen sect

Soto is the largest of the three traditional sects of Zen in Japanese Buddhism

It emphasizes Shikantaza, meditation with no objects, anchors, or content.

The meditator strives to be aware of the stream of thoughts, allowing them to arise and pass away without interference.

Dogen, the founder of Soto in Japan, emphasized that practice and awakening cannot be separated.

Haiku is an expression of direct experience, and the poem should provide at least a hint about the season of the year, often in just one word called a kigo.

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Photo Credit   

My tanka based on the learnings in Zen Buddhism using the photo above as the vision, my love of nature.

autumn approaching

midday sunlight in the sky

cooling down slowly

body full of caring spirits

memories of a vision

Carpe Diem Namaste, The Spiritual Way #2 Pilgrimage

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Carpe Diem Namaste, The Spiritual Way #2 Pilgrimage

Haiku is not only the poetry of nature but also the poetry of the spiritual nature.

At Carpe Diem we are going to explore the spiritual background of haiku and tanka.

This episode of “Namasté” is titled pilgrimage

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Photo Credit  

We are on our way to our Inner Self, as the inside of a shell.

We encounter a scene, like the sound of a pebble thrown into the water and that brings us to a scene to create a haiku or tanka.

Self- discovery – that is human life should be on a constant pilgrimage of discovery, going deep into the inner-self, with the feelings of the vision felt throughout the whole body.

That’s a spiritual haiku or tanka, it is amazing feeling it takes over the whole body for a split-second.

A recording of that vision capture in the mind.

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Photo Credit     An ocellated (spotted) octopus using a clamshell as a shelter

Tanka with deep thought’s from within – that vision is recorded in my mind – a haiku or tanka must come from a vision, my vision was the photo above when I first glimpse it.

curled up in clamshell
totally lost while resting
careless of surrounds
the beauty of that moment
lives in my body forever