Weekly Haiku – Senryu Prompt Challenge – 13 – Survival & Life

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Weekly Haiku – Senryu Prompt Challenge – 13 – Survival & Life

Photo Credit

#weeklyhaikuchallenge -13

Simple Guidelines.

Using the words “survival & life” or just one or the other, write a Haiku or Senryu poem.

Haiku (also called nature or seasonal haiku) is a unrhymed Japanese verse consisting of three unrhymed lines of five, seven, and five syllables (5, 7, 5) or 17 syllables in all.

There is much more to haiku than the made-up 5/7/5 version.

Here is an in-depth description of Haiku – Senryu (also called human haiku) is a unrhymed Japanese verse consisting of three unrhymed lines of five, seven, and five syllables (5, 7, 5) or 17 syllables in all. Senryu is usually written in the present tense and only references to some aspect of human nature or emotions. They possess no references to the natural world and thus stand out from nature/seasonal haiku.

You can write your haiku or senryu poem any way you like not necessary the 5/7/5 version.

Not sure of your Syllable count? Check Here

You can use the picture above, your own or no picture at all.

Copy and paste the link of your finished Haiku or Senryu in the comments below. I will acknowledge them the following week, also share on social networks as I receive them.

My Haiku or Senryu Poem  – using the word “survival & life”.

sturdy buildings stand
tree fighting for survival
life is a challenge

Bloggers that wrote for the Weekly Haiku Prompt Challenge – Week 12 – Enjoying & Water – 24 October 2017. Thank you

Mary Rose is the owner of Cactus Haiku she enjoys writing Haiku – Senryu poetry, have a look at her poetry, I think you will enjoy them.

Reena Saxena Founder of ReInventions — Coach, Trainer, Writer and Personal Branding Consultant

Charmedchaos – Musings of Life, interesting poetry, short stories

Carpe Diem #1292 Winds of Conquest (BrunuhVille)

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The last musical prompt for October 2017, in which Kristjaan is celebrating his fifth anniversary of Carpe Diem Kai.

Today we have another beautiful composition by our young Portuguese composer BrunuhVille.

I think this is a beautiful composition, it’s called Epic Fantasy Music. And it sounds epic if I may say so.

leaves fall
only bare branches remain
wind has won

© Chèvrefeuille (experimental haiku)

My inspiration for a tanka poem after listening to BrunuhVille music.

strong flute echoing
whispering tunes in the breeze
breathtaking music
ripples are stronger than me
holding my breath in surprise

Weekend Writing Prompt #26 – Wishes

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Weekend Writing Prompt #26 – Wishes

To Participate in Sammi Cox Challenge, use the link above.

 Use the prompts separately or together.  It’s up to you.  Write a piece of flash fiction, a poem, a chapter for your novel…anything you like.  Or take the challenge below. 

The prompt – Wishes

Challenge

The challenges this week are all about brevity:

Prose Challenge – Tell us a story about “three wishes” in 200 words.

Poetry Challenge – Write a cinquain on the theme of wishes.

Cinquain Poem

wishes
thou shall not share
happiness will not come true
an old wives tale from ancient times
believe

A cinquain is a short, usually unrhymed poem consisting of twenty-two syllables distributed as 2, 4, 6, 8, 2, in five lines.

Weekly Tanka Prompt Challenge – Week 68 – Medals & Memories

Weekly Tanka Prompt Challenge – Week 68 – Medals & Memories

Talismans_a_go_go

Photo Credit

#weeklytankachallenge -68

Simple Guidelines.

Using the words “medals & memories” and write a tanka poem.

Tanka poetry consists of five units, usually with the following pattern of    5-7-5-7-7 which is syllables.

The first three lines (5/7/5) are the upper phase. This upper stage is where you create an image in your reader’s mind.

The last two lines (7/7) of a Tanka poem are called the lower phase.  The final two lines should express the poet’s ideas about the image that was created in the three lines above.

Not sure of your Syllable count? Check Here

  1. You can use the picture above, your own or no picture at all.

Copy and paste the link of your finished tanka in the comments below. I will acknowledge them the following week, also share on social networks.

My tanka poem  – using the words “medals & memories”.

keepsakes and memories
medals jewelry displays
buyers love to view
lifetime of saving nicknacks
have few to show of glory

There is no deadline here, if you would like to write a Tanka Poem from past weeks please do, I will add them to the appropriate week so readers can read them.

Bloggers that entered “Weekly Tanka Challenge” Week 67 – Landscape & Artwork – 18 October 2017. Thank you.

Joelle LeGendre – Two on a Rant, only on her own at the moment.

Frank J Tassone – Writer, Teacher, Husband and father, he has a Haijin in Action blog

The Bag Lady – Cheryl is a widow, handicapped, a constant writer on her blog, loves doing most things.

Reena SaxenaFounder of ReInventions — Coach, Trainer, Writer and Personal Branding Consultant

Sarah Whiley She writes short stories, poems, and has a weekly challenge for writers, interesting website.

Petru JviljoenShe is an artist that prefers to work with oil paints but works with others, new at writing, new website, please have a look.

Charmedchaos – Musings of Life, interesting poetry, short stories

Carpe Diem #1286 Love

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Carpe Diem #1286 Love

Today the prompt is love.

Chèvrefeuille say’s – Love … not actually a feeling that you will expect in haiku because love is more the terrain of tanka (or waka), but I think that haiku can be a love poem too. I even think I have said that more often here at CDHK.

Love is one of the strongest senses we have. Love for someone, love for e.g. reading and painting, but also love for nature. That love is the most important for haiku. Haiku is known as the poetry of nature and to create them you have to love nature, being in close contact with nature.

He shares a quote from one of the Tokubetsudesu episodes:

[…] “Haiku is love, a love that grabs you by the throat and takes you into an adventure to discover the beauty of our world in all her beautiful details and bring that into the tiny form of haiku that shows us a scene, a moment that lasts only one heart beat.” […] 

And here to introduce love … a haiku which I wrote several years ago:

the last steps taken
to find universal love
the sound of rain

© Chèvrefeuille (2014)

rural_landscape

Photo Credit.

My Thought – Yes, the love of NATURE is always in my soul I Love animals.

animals need grass
dry natural rural landscape
needs a little rain

When I saw this image it made me sad “What are they eating”?

Weekly Haiku – Senryu Prompt Challenge – 12 – Enjoying & Water

Dolphins

Weekly Haiku – Senryu Prompt Challenge – 12 – Enjoying & Water

Photo Credit

#weeklyhaikuchallenge -12

Simple Guidelines.

Using the words “enjoying & water” or just one or the other, write a Haiku or Senryu poem.

Haiku (also called nature or seasonal haiku) is an unrhymed Japanese verse consisting of three unrhymed lines of five, seven, and five syllables (5, 7, 5) or 17 syllables in all.

There is much more to haiku than the made-up 5/7/5 version.

Here is an in-depth description of Haiku – Senryu (also called human haiku) is an unrhymed Japanese verse consisting of three unrhymed lines of five, seven, and five syllables (5, 7, 5) or 17 syllables in all. Senryu is usually written in the present tense and only references to some aspect of human nature or emotions. They possess no references to the natural world and thus stand out from nature/seasonal haiku.

You can write your haiku or senryu poem any way you like not necessary the 5/7/5 version.

Not sure of your Syllable count? Check Here

You can use the picture above, your own or no picture at all.

Copy and paste the link of your finished Haiku or Senryu in the comments below. I will acknowledge them the following week, also share on social networks as I receive them.

My Haiku or Senryu Poem  – using the word “enjoying & water”.

still jade blue water
humans enjoying contact
with dolphins swimming

 

Bloggers that wrote for the Weekly Haiku Prompt Challenge – Week 11 – Bright & Colorful – 17 October 2017. Thank You.

@LMLeffew when she is not working or writing, she likes to read, swill coffee, catch up on television series, plus much more.

Reena SaxenaFounder of ReInventions — Coach, Trainer, Writer and Personal Branding Consultant

Vandana – her website title – Feelings and Freedom, she likes Reading, Writing, Music, And Nature it shows in her blogs. Check it out, please.

Charmedchaos – Musings of Life, interesting poetry, short stories

Landscape Epanalepsis poem

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Landscape Epanalepsis poem

My first attempt at writing an Epanalepsis poem using a photo I took while I was at our farm last week.

Thanks to Mick and all his new forms of poetry, I did try, if you would like to,

here is the link,

Standing at the gateway, camera in my hand, holding
Waiting for my husband to return, to drive me back home
he returns walking along the track, I’m still waiting.
Sun is shining too bright, can only see the sun
camera in my hand, focus click, hand still on the camera
Cannot see hope that I have a photo even if I cannot see
Surprise when I downloaded the photo on my computer
I view a nice landscape photo of the farm what a surprise.

The color coding:

RED: The repeated words in epanalepsis don’t have to be identical, but must be in context.

BLUE: Epanalepsis can occur across two sentences.

GREEN: The same word used at the beginning, and end of a sentence.

MAUVE: Epanalepsis can occur within a clause of a sentence.

Weekend Writing Prompt #25 – Fragment

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Weekend Writing Prompt #25 – Fragment

Photo Credit

To Participate in Sammi Cox Challenge, use the link above.

 Use the prompts separately or together.  It’s up to you.  Write a piece of flash fiction, a poem, a chapter for your novel…anything you like.  Or take the challenge below. 

The prompt – Fragment

Challenge

Prose Challenge – Tell a story in five sentences about why the ground is cracking up in the photo above.  Don’t forget to mention what implications it might have for your character(s).

Poetry Challenge – Write a five line poem that includes at least three of the following synonyms for “fragment”:

  • piece
  • splinter
  • snippet
  • particle
  • break
  • shatter
  • fracture
  • disintegrate
  • crack

My Tanka

The shattered fragments
particle breaking away
causing a large crack
to splinter the world in half
piece by piece global warming

Carpe Diem #1284 meaning of life (BrunuhVille)

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Carpe Diem #1284 meaning of life (BrunuhVille)

Today Chèvrefeuille has a nice piece of music for our inspiration.

It’s titled “meaning of life” and the young Portuguese musician BrunuhVille composed it.

Listen to the music and let it take you with it 

My inspiration for a tanka poem after listening to BrunuhVille music.

peaceful relaxing
following stars through heaven
painting cool pictures
it is so emotional
like traveling with wings spread

Carpe Diem #1283 On Our Way Home

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Carpe Diem #1283 On Our Way Home

Chèvrefeuille wrote this –  Copied from His blog on BLOGSPOT, the link is above.

We are celebrating our fifth anniversary and I feel somewhat sad that this month is closing into its end, but until that moment we have still a few wonderful memories to look back at.

Today I have chosen a prompt that I used in December 2015, on our way home. It was one of the episodes I created about that wonderful haibun by Matsuo Basho, Oku no Hosomichi (Narrow Road Into the Deep North).

In December 2015 we followed his journey into the deep north and read his journal with each other. I remember that it is was a wonderful month in which we became even more in contact with the spirit of Basho, my master.

In that (triple) episode I mentioned a famous haiku poet and close friend of Basho, Kasugi Issho. Issho is not a well-known haiku poet nowadays, but it is said that he wrote wonderful haiku and love-poems.

Here is the only haiku which I could find written by Kasugi Issho. I have tried to translate it and honor Issho with that translation.

mi tsukushita me wa shirgiku ni  modori keri

seen with my eyes
white chrysanthemums
again I saw them

© Kasugi Issho (1652-1688)

A wonderful haiku Chèvrefeuille say’s –  As I have said often in five years of our existence haiku is the most beautiful way to express your feelings and thoughts.

My Post for “We are on our way home”, and thank you Kristjan for being a wonderful host.

I have learned so much about Japanese poetry and so much more in the last year since I wrote the Tributes for Jane Reichhold’s Legacy.

https://ramblingsofawriter2016.com/category/carpe-diem-jane-reichholds-legacy/

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Photo Credit

My Haiku using the above image as a prompt

on my way back home
the world is before me now
nature at its best