T is for Tuatara #atozchallenge

Sphenodon_punctatus_in_Waikanae,_New_Zealand

A to Z April 2017  Challenge – Animals Birds & Insects Pantoum Poetry

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24 April 2017 – T is for Tuatara

Tuatara is a small to medium sized reptiles endemic to New Zealand, can live well over 100 years
Although resembling most lizards, they are part of a distinct lineage, the order Rhynchocephalia
Tuatara are greenish brown and gray, and measure up to 80 cm (31 in) from head to tail-tip
Today the tuatara is nearly extinct on the mainland of New Zealand, only living on small island around NZ

Although resembling most lizards, they are part of a distinct lineage, the order Rhynchocephalia
Their dentition, in which two rows of teeth in the upper jaw overlap one row on the lower jaw
Today the tuatara is nearly extinct on the mainland of New Zealand, only living on small island around NZ
They are even more unusual in having a pronounced photoreceptive eye, the “third eye”

Their dentition, in which two rows of teeth in the upper jaw overlap one row on the lower jaw
The tuatara also has a spiny crest along the back, especially pronounced in males.
They are even more unusual in having a pronounced photoreceptive eye, the “third eye”
They are able to hear, although no external ear is present, also have excellent vision

The tuatara also has a spiny crest along the back, especially pronounced in males.
Have a number of unique features in their skeleton, apparently evolutionarily retained from fish.
They are able to hear, although no external ear is present, also have excellent vision
Their diet consists of frogs, lizards, and bird’s eggs, chicks, beetles, crickets, and spiders.

Have a number of unique features in their skeleton, apparently evolutionarily retained from fish.
Tuatara reproduces is very slowly, taking 10 to 20 years to reach sexual maturity.
Their diet consists of frogs, lizards, and bird’s eggs, chicks, beetles, crickets, and spiders
Mating occurs in midsummer; females mate and lay eggs once every four years.

Tuatara reproduces is very slowly, taking 10 to 20 years to reach sexual maturity.
Males don’t have a penis, reproducing by the male lifting the female tail and placing his vent over hers.
Mating occurs in midsummer; females mate and lay eggs once every four years
Tuatara eggs have a soft, parchment-like shell which she digs and lays into the ground

Males don’t have a penis, reproducing by the male lifting the female tail and placing his vent over hers.
Females take between 1 and 3 years to provide eggs with yolk, up to seven months to form the shell.
Tuatara eggs have a soft, parchment-like shell which she digs and lays into the ground
It then takes between 12 and 15 months from copulation to hatching.

Females take between 1 and 3 years to provide eggs with yolk, up to seven months to form the shell.
Wild tuatara are known to be still reproducing at about 60 years of age
It then takes between 12 and 15 months from copulation to hatching.
This means reproduction occurs at two- to five-year intervals, the slowest in any reptile

Wild tuatara are known to be still reproducing at about 60 years of age
Tuatara are greenish brown and gray, and measure up to 80 cm (31 in) from head to tail-tip
This means reproduction occurs at two- to five-year intervals, the slowest in any reptile
Tuatara is a small to medium sized reptiles endemic to New Zealand, can live well over 100 years.

Interesting facts:

“Henry”, a male tuatara at Southland Museum in Invercargill, New Zealand, became a father (possibly for the first time) on 23 January 2009, at the age of 111.

Tuatara probably has the slowest growth rates of any reptile, continuing to grow larger for the first 35 years of their lives.

The average lifespan is about 60 years, but they can live to be well over 100 years old. Some experts believe that captive tuatara could live as long as 200 years.

During routine maintenance work at Karori Sanctuary in late 2008, a tuatara nest was uncovered, with a hatchling found the following autumn.

This is thought to be the first case of tuatara successfully breeding on the New Zealand mainland in over 200 years, outside of captive rearing facilities.

T

How to write Pantoum Poetryhttp://shadowpoetry.com/resources/wip/pantoum.html

8 thoughts on “T is for Tuatara #atozchallenge

  1. Wow! And I thought that I had to wait a long time for a baby! 🙂 I think I’d have a heart attack if I walked into my yard to find one of those looking back at me. Well, I’d have the heart attack *after* taking its picture.:) I’d let it stay, though, because it eats spiders and there are quite a few around here that need to be eaten before they eat me.

    I enjoyed your post. Have a blessed day!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks for commenting, you have had some very interesting post about animals etc in you A to Z challenge that I have learned about, coming to the end now, bit sad, April went too fast.
      Hope you are having a great week.

      Like

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