Carpe Diem’s Tanka Splendor #4 New Life

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Carpe Diem’s Tanka Splendor #4 New Life

Photo Credit

look and you will see
new life is all around us
you cannot see it
believe it and you will see
as time never stands still

I have written this for a new episode for Carpe Diem’s Tanka Splendor, #4 – New Life.

If you would like to write a tanka poem, Check out the link at the top of this post.

K is for Kakapo #atozchallenge

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A to Z April 2017  Challenge – Animals Birds & Insects Pantoum Poetry

Photo Credit    Kakapo Trevor feeding on poroporo fruit.

13 April 2017  – K is for Kakapo

The kakapo is a large, flightless nocturnal, ground-dwelling parrot in New Zealand
It is the world’s only flightless parrot, also the heaviest parrot, it’s critically endangered
It has finely blotched yellow-green plumage, and a large gray beak, short legs, large feet
Its wings and tail of relatively short length making it unique among its kind

It is the world’s only flightless parrot, also the heaviest parrot, it’s critically endangered
As of June 2016, the total known adult population was 154 living individuals
Its wings and tail of relatively short length making it unique among its kind
Conservation efforts began in the 1890s, but not very successful until the 1980s

As of June 2016, the total known adult population was 154 living individuals
It uses its wings for balance, support, and to break its fall when leaping from trees
Conservation efforts began in the 1890s, but not very successful until the 1980s
Now considered to be one of the most critically endangered animal species on the planet

It uses its wings for balance, support, and to break its fall when leaping from trees
Kakapo has a well-developed sense of smell, which complements its nocturnal lifestyle
Now considered to be one of the most critically endangered animal species on the planet
It roosts under cover in trees or on the ground during the day, moves around its territories at night

Kakapo has a well-developed sense of smell, which complements its nocturnal lifestyle
Though the kakapo cannot fly, it is an excellent climber, ascending to the crowns of the tallest trees.
It roosts under cover in trees or on the ground during the day, moves around its territories at night
They also “parachute”, descending by leaping and spreading its wings, this way it travels a few meters

Though the kakapo cannot fly, it is an excellent climber, ascending to the crowns of the tallest trees.
To attract females, males make loud booming calls from their bowls by inflating a thoracic sac.
They also “parachute”, descending by leaping and spreading its wings, this way it travels a few meters
Once the birds have mated, the female returns to her home territory to lay eggs and raise the chicks

To attract females, males make loud, booming calls from their bowls by inflating a thoracic sac.
The male continues booming in the hope of attracting more female. Don’t boom until about 5 years of age.
Once the birds have mated, the female returns to her home territory to lay eggs and raise the chicks
Generally, females do not seek out males until they are between 9 and 11 years old

The male continues booming in the hope of attracting more female. Don’t boom until about 5 years of age.
The kakapo does not breed every year and has one of the lowest rates of reproduction among birds.
Generally, females do not seek out males until they are between 9 and 11 years old
Female kakapo lays 1 or 2 eggs per breeding cycle, with long intervals between laying first and second egg

The kakapo does not breed every year and has one of the lowest rates of reproduction among birds.
She nests on the ground under the cover of plants or in cavities such as hollow tree trunks.
Female kakapo lays 1 or 2 eggs per breeding cycle, with long intervals between laying first and second egg
Kakapo eggs usually hatch within 30 days, bearing fluffy gray chicks that are quite helpless.

She nests on the ground under the cover of plants or in cavities such as hollow tree trunks.
After the eggs hatch, the female feeds chicks for three months, remaining with the female after fledging
Kakapo eggs usually hatch within 30 days, bearing fluffy gray chicks that are quite helpless
Kakapo tend to live very long lives with the average individual getting to around sixty years

After the eggs hatch, the female feeds chicks for three months, remaining with the female after fledging
It has finely blotched yellow-green plumage, and a large gray beak, short legs, large feet
Kakapo tend to live very long lives with the average individual getting to around sixty years
The kakapo is a large, flightless nocturnal, ground-dwelling parrot in New Zealand.

K

How to write Pantoum Poetry . http://shadowpoetry.com/resources/wip/pantoum.html